$trange Language

Parenting in a Media-Saturated World
Should toddlers watch TV? Is educational programming beneficial for preschoolers? What happens when school-age children play violent video games? How are teenagers using the Internet? In today’s world, these are the questions that challenge parents on a daily (and sometimes hourly!) basis. In the United States, 99 percent of all households with children have televisions, while among households with eight to eighteen year olds, 85 percent have personal computers and 83 percent have video game consoles. Children ages two to seven watch on average 2.56 hours of television per day and children eight to eighteen watch on average 5.40 hours per day. Clearly, the lives of American children are saturated with media, but how does this overwhelming presence of media impact children’s well being? More importantly, what can parents do to exert some control over this media presence in their children’s lives?
Read More

Parenting in a Media-Saturated World

Should toddlers watch TV? Is educational programming beneficial for preschoolers? What happens when school-age children play violent video games? How are teenagers using the Internet? In today’s world, these are the questions that challenge parents on a daily (and sometimes hourly!) basis. In the United States, 99 percent of all households with children have televisions, while among households with eight to eighteen year olds, 85 percent have personal computers and 83 percent have video game consoles. Children ages two to seven watch on average 2.56 hours of television per day and children eight to eighteen watch on average 5.40 hours per day. Clearly, the lives of American children are saturated with media, but how does this overwhelming presence of media impact children’s well being? More importantly, what can parents do to exert some control over this media presence in their children’s lives?

Read More

(via kaki-sama)

Source redbrickfarmhouse

Reblogged from redbrickfarmhouse

College Sports and the Price of Poverty
The NCPA and Drexel University Department of Sport Management conducted a joint study, which blames colleges sports scandals on a black market created by unethical and unpractical NCAA restrictions on college athletes.  Examining football and basketball teams from Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) colleges, the study calculates athletes’ out-of-pocket educational related expenses associated with a “full” scholarship, compares the room and board portion of players’ scholarships to the federal poverty line and coaches’ and athletic administrators’ salaries, and uses NFL and NBA collective bargaining agreements to estimate the fair market value of FBS football and basketball players.  The study highlights college presidents’ admission of their inability to reform college sports and calls for federal intervention to help bring forth a new model of amateurism in college sports that emphasizes education, minimizes violations, and allows players to seek commercial opportunities.
Read More

College Sports and the Price of Poverty

The NCPA and Drexel University Department of Sport Management conducted a joint study, which blames colleges sports scandals on a black market created by unethical and unpractical NCAA restrictions on college athletes.  Examining football and basketball teams from Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) colleges, the study calculates athletes’ out-of-pocket educational related expenses associated with a “full” scholarship, compares the room and board portion of players’ scholarships to the federal poverty line and coaches’ and athletic administrators’ salaries, and uses NFL and NBA collective bargaining agreements to estimate the fair market value of FBS football and basketball players.  The study highlights college presidents’ admission of their inability to reform college sports and calls for federal intervention to help bring forth a new model of amateurism in college sports that emphasizes education, minimizes violations, and allows players to seek commercial opportunities.

Read More

(via unknowwgirl)

Source bernardcedric

Reblogged from cédric bernard

Study: Tattoos and Employment
Yes, visible tattoos still carry a negative connotation among employers and could be hurting your chances of getting hired, according to a new study by Dr. Andrew Timming of St. Andrew’s University School of Management in Scotland.

(About 23 percent of Americans today have a tattoo, and 32 percent of people ages 30-45 have at least one, according to a separate study by Pew Research Center.)
After Dr. Timming interviewed hiring managers and recruiters from 14 different organizations — who worked in places including banks, schools and prisons — he found the majority of those surveyed said that visible tattoos remain a stigma, according to Management Issues, a management information website.
Read More

Study: Tattoos and Employment

Yes, visible tattoos still carry a negative connotation among employers and could be hurting your chances of getting hired, according to a new study by Dr. Andrew Timming of St. Andrew’s University School of Management in Scotland.

(About 23 percent of Americans today have a tattoo, and 32 percent of people ages 30-45 have at least one, according to a separate study by Pew Research Center.)

After Dr. Timming interviewed hiring managers and recruiters from 14 different organizations — who worked in places including banks, schools and prisons — he found the majority of those surveyed said that visible tattoos remain a stigma, according to Management Issues, a management information website.

Read More

(via pigeons-n-planes)

Source boywhocriedw0lf

Reblogged from Stay Gold

Religion and The Repression of Sexuality
Western religions have spent millenia inflicting shame, guilt, repression and punishment upon human sexuality — especially upon women’s sexuality.
Asian faiths aren’t so punitive. They generally accept lovemaking as a natural part of life. Some Hindu temples are covered with statues of copulating gods and goddesses. Millions of Shiva worshipers pray over models of his erect penis. Tantric sects practice ritual intercourse.
But the West presents an opposite, ugly story: a long chronicle of religious hostility to lovers — for no rational reason.
Read More

Religion and The Repression of Sexuality

Western religions have spent millenia inflicting shame, guilt, repression and punishment upon human sexuality — especially upon women’s sexuality.

Asian faiths aren’t so punitive. They generally accept lovemaking as a natural part of life. Some Hindu temples are covered with statues of copulating gods and goddesses. Millions of Shiva worshipers pray over models of his erect penis. Tantric sects practice ritual intercourse.

But the West presents an opposite, ugly story: a long chronicle of religious hostility to lovers — for no rational reason.

Read More

(via smellherflowerz)

Source fuegoking

Reblogged from rich homie

The Evolution of Human Artistic Creativity
Creating visual art is one of the defining characteristics of the human species, but the paucity of archaeological evidence means that we have limited information on the origin and evolution of this aspect of human culture. The components of art include colour, pattern and the reproduction of visual likeness. The 2D and 3D art forms that were created by Upper Palaeolithic Europeans at least 30 000 years ago are conceptually equivalent to those created in recent centuries, indicating that human cognition and symbolling activity, as well as anatomy, were fully modern by that time. The origins of art are therefore much more ancient and lie within Africa, before worldwide human dispersal
Read More

The Evolution of Human Artistic Creativity

Creating visual art is one of the defining characteristics of the human species, but the paucity of archaeological evidence means that we have limited information on the origin and evolution of this aspect of human culture. The components of art include colour, pattern and the reproduction of visual likeness. The 2D and 3D art forms that were created by Upper Palaeolithic Europeans at least 30 000 years ago are conceptually equivalent to those created in recent centuries, indicating that human cognition and symbolling activity, as well as anatomy, were fully modern by that time. The origins of art are therefore much more ancient and lie within Africa, before worldwide human dispersal

Read More

(via thevuas)

Source waterlord00

Reblogged from your waterlord

Understanding Generation Z
Gen Z is the fledgling generation, born after 1995, that follows the Millennials (definitions of Gen Z vary, with some considering the year 2000 as its starting point). This generation can be considered the first true mobile mavens. They will take for granted a world of smartphones, tablets and high-speed wireless Internet, untethered from the constraints of a landline or a traditional Internet connection. They won’t distinguish between online and offline, since their mobile devices will keep them connected most of the time. This will create a unique mindset, especially when it comes to accessing information.
Even the youngest are attuned to new devices, with some toddlers attempting to treat magazines like iPads and TVs like touch screens. So Gen Z will be tech-fluent in many ways, and certainly more connected than any generation before it. One consequence will be a multicultural and globally oriented mindset—even more so than the Millennials that preceded them. Kids are already Skyping with friends and family on the other side of the globe. A quarter of Gen Z participants in this study said all or most of their social-network friends live a plane journey away. Expect even more linguistic and cultural borrowings and consistencies across nations and regions.
Read More

Understanding Generation Z

Gen Z is the fledgling generation, born after 1995, that follows the Millennials (definitions of Gen Z vary, with some considering the year 2000 as its starting point). This generation can be considered the first true mobile mavens. They will take for granted a world of smartphones, tablets and high-speed wireless Internet, untethered from the constraints of a landline or a traditional Internet connection. They won’t distinguish between online and offline, since their mobile devices will keep them connected most of the time. This will create a unique mindset, especially when it comes to accessing information.

Even the youngest are attuned to new devices, with some toddlers attempting to treat magazines like iPads and TVs like touch screens. So Gen Z will be tech-fluent in many ways, and certainly more connected than any generation before it. One consequence will be a multicultural and globally oriented mindset—even more so than the Millennials that preceded them. Kids are already Skyping with friends and family on the other side of the globe. A quarter of Gen Z participants in this study said all or most of their social-network friends live a plane journey away. Expect even more linguistic and cultural borrowings and consistencies across nations and regions.

Read More

(via thehourisuponus)

Source darrenhendren

Reblogged from darren

50 Things You Didn’t Know About Nike
50 years ago, on January 25th, 1964, Nike was born. Well, not Nike we as we know it, but on that date Phil Knight and Bill Bowerman founded Blue Ribbon Sports, which would eventually turn into the biggest athletic brand in the world. With its roots on the campus of the University of Oregon—where Bowerman coached track and Knight ran for him—Nike would change the world of footwear and, eventually, turn a generation of consumers into “sneakerheads.” That’s old news, but with the brand celebrating a half-century in the game, it’s the perfect point to reflect on the little-known tidbits that have occurred over the past 50 years: Who was Nike’s first employee? What was the brand’s first sneaker? Why didn’t Michael Jordan want to wear the Air Jordan 1?
Read More

50 Things You Didn’t Know About Nike

50 years ago, on January 25th, 1964, Nike was born. Well, not Nike we as we know it, but on that date Phil Knight and Bill Bowerman founded Blue Ribbon Sports, which would eventually turn into the biggest athletic brand in the world. With its roots on the campus of the University of Oregon—where Bowerman coached track and Knight ran for him—Nike would change the world of footwear and, eventually, turn a generation of consumers into “sneakerheads.” That’s old news, but with the brand celebrating a half-century in the game, it’s the perfect point to reflect on the little-known tidbits that have occurred over the past 50 years: Who was Nike’s first employee? What was the brand’s first sneaker? Why didn’t Michael Jordan want to wear the Air Jordan 1?

Read More

(via illxnana)

Source andyattero

Reblogged from 赃物