$trange Language

Parenting in a Media-Saturated World
Should toddlers watch TV? Is educational programming beneficial for preschoolers? What happens when school-age children play violent video games? How are teenagers using the Internet? In today’s world, these are the questions that challenge parents on a daily (and sometimes hourly!) basis. In the United States, 99 percent of all households with children have televisions, while among households with eight to eighteen year olds, 85 percent have personal computers and 83 percent have video game consoles. Children ages two to seven watch on average 2.56 hours of television per day and children eight to eighteen watch on average 5.40 hours per day. Clearly, the lives of American children are saturated with media, but how does this overwhelming presence of media impact children’s well being? More importantly, what can parents do to exert some control over this media presence in their children’s lives?
Read More

Parenting in a Media-Saturated World

Should toddlers watch TV? Is educational programming beneficial for preschoolers? What happens when school-age children play violent video games? How are teenagers using the Internet? In today’s world, these are the questions that challenge parents on a daily (and sometimes hourly!) basis. In the United States, 99 percent of all households with children have televisions, while among households with eight to eighteen year olds, 85 percent have personal computers and 83 percent have video game consoles. Children ages two to seven watch on average 2.56 hours of television per day and children eight to eighteen watch on average 5.40 hours per day. Clearly, the lives of American children are saturated with media, but how does this overwhelming presence of media impact children’s well being? More importantly, what can parents do to exert some control over this media presence in their children’s lives?

Read More

(via kaki-sama)

Source redbrickfarmhouse

Reblogged from redbrickfarmhouse

College Sports and the Price of Poverty
The NCPA and Drexel University Department of Sport Management conducted a joint study, which blames colleges sports scandals on a black market created by unethical and unpractical NCAA restrictions on college athletes.  Examining football and basketball teams from Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) colleges, the study calculates athletes’ out-of-pocket educational related expenses associated with a “full” scholarship, compares the room and board portion of players’ scholarships to the federal poverty line and coaches’ and athletic administrators’ salaries, and uses NFL and NBA collective bargaining agreements to estimate the fair market value of FBS football and basketball players.  The study highlights college presidents’ admission of their inability to reform college sports and calls for federal intervention to help bring forth a new model of amateurism in college sports that emphasizes education, minimizes violations, and allows players to seek commercial opportunities.
Read More

College Sports and the Price of Poverty

The NCPA and Drexel University Department of Sport Management conducted a joint study, which blames colleges sports scandals on a black market created by unethical and unpractical NCAA restrictions on college athletes.  Examining football and basketball teams from Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) colleges, the study calculates athletes’ out-of-pocket educational related expenses associated with a “full” scholarship, compares the room and board portion of players’ scholarships to the federal poverty line and coaches’ and athletic administrators’ salaries, and uses NFL and NBA collective bargaining agreements to estimate the fair market value of FBS football and basketball players.  The study highlights college presidents’ admission of their inability to reform college sports and calls for federal intervention to help bring forth a new model of amateurism in college sports that emphasizes education, minimizes violations, and allows players to seek commercial opportunities.

Read More

(via unknowwgirl)

Source bernardcedric

Reblogged from cédric bernard

Study: Tattoos and Employment
Yes, visible tattoos still carry a negative connotation among employers and could be hurting your chances of getting hired, according to a new study by Dr. Andrew Timming of St. Andrew’s University School of Management in Scotland.

(About 23 percent of Americans today have a tattoo, and 32 percent of people ages 30-45 have at least one, according to a separate study by Pew Research Center.)
After Dr. Timming interviewed hiring managers and recruiters from 14 different organizations — who worked in places including banks, schools and prisons — he found the majority of those surveyed said that visible tattoos remain a stigma, according to Management Issues, a management information website.
Read More

Study: Tattoos and Employment

Yes, visible tattoos still carry a negative connotation among employers and could be hurting your chances of getting hired, according to a new study by Dr. Andrew Timming of St. Andrew’s University School of Management in Scotland.

(About 23 percent of Americans today have a tattoo, and 32 percent of people ages 30-45 have at least one, according to a separate study by Pew Research Center.)

After Dr. Timming interviewed hiring managers and recruiters from 14 different organizations — who worked in places including banks, schools and prisons — he found the majority of those surveyed said that visible tattoos remain a stigma, according to Management Issues, a management information website.

Read More

(via lets-jet)

Source boywhocriedw0lf

Reblogged from Stay Gold